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WHISKY HARDWARE


If you're a fan of drinking whisky, then you know that there's more to enjoying a glass of this marvellous malt than just pouring it into any old tumbler. While there are many different styles of whisky glasses to choose from, the right glass will help to release the volatile compounds, which in turn will improve its flavour, aroma and ultimately your experience. So read on to learn a bit more about what glass works best with each whisky drink... Your tastebuds will thank you!


The Glencairn Glass

Since its launch in 2001, the Glencairn glass has become an essential tool for whisky lovers around the world. The design was based on the traditional nosing 'copitas' used in Scottish Whisky labs, and enhances the flavour and aroma of whisky; with a unique bowl shape that narrows at the rim. This design allows for easy swirling, while the tapered opening concentrates the aroma of the spirit. The majority of Glencairn glasses are lead-free crystal, making it a stylish way to enjoy your favourite whisky and a great gift for any whisky-lover. Whether you're a connoisseur or simply enjoy the occasional dram, the Glencairn glass is a must-have and is what we use for drinking any whisky neat or with a touch of water.


The Irish Whiskey Glass

Few things embody the rich history and culture of Irish Whiskey like enjoying it from a well-crafted glass. The Irish whiskey glass, or Túath (Tu-ah), is not your typical barware; with a distinct shape and size, such as a straight-sided tulip with a curved lip constructed of high-quality lead crystal. Not only do Irish whiskey glasses enhance the aromas of the whisky when you take that first swirl, but they also add elegance and distinction to any Irish whiskey experience. Up your game and your glassware collection, by enjoying your next Irish whiskey from an Irish whiskey glass!


The Highball Glass

A highball glass is a tall, thin glass that is typically used for serving a longer mixed drink, often mixed with tonic or soda water. The term "highball" actually refers to the drink itself, not the glass. Highballs were first popularised in the United States in the late 19th century, and the most common spirits used in highballs are whisky and bourbon. The highball glass is also sometimes called a Collins glass or a fizz glass. Grab a glass, add some whisky and go long...


The Tumbler

The whisky tumbler is a glass that has been specifically designed for drinking whisky. Also known as a rocks or lowball glass, it is characterised by its short, wide bowl and heavy base. Whisky tumblers are typically made from glass or crystal, and they often have a decorative leaded rim. The heavy base helps to prevent the glass from tipping over, and the wide bowl allows for the full appreciation of the whisky's aroma. While the traditional tumbler is clear, many modern versions feature etched or frosted designs. If you fancy a whisky cocktail, then a proper tumbler is essential for enjoying your favourite short serve whisky cocktails. Ours is an Old Fashioned...


The Shot Glass

Whisky was initially drunk from a 'quaich,' a traditional wooden cup that was used as a communal drinking vessel. However, as whisky grew in popularity, people began serving it in smaller, more concentrated doses and a shot became a standard way of consuming whisky and the whisky shot glass was born. Generally made out of glass or crystal and holding around 30-60ml, it is an iconic symbol of whisky that is recognised across the globe today. So, if you fancy a taster or a shot, then a whisky shot glass is a must-have!


So there you have it – we’ve shown you five different types of whisky glass you should have as part of your whisky collection to enhance your drinking experience. Now it’s time for you to try them all out and find your favourite way to drink this delicious spirit. There are many places to get a good whisky glass, but we would recommend heading to www.glencairn.co.uk and checking out their full range of glasses and gifts... Cheers!


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